25 March, 2019
By ayduns

Do you want to use Civi in multiple languages? This new feature adds more options to enable users to access CiviCRM in their language of choice.

This feature allows admins to configure a list of languages for users to select from and set the language of the CiviCRM interface for their own use.  This translates the CiviCRM interface but does not translate content.  For example, the menus are translated but content and option values (eg Mr/Mrs) are not translated.

Users have a 'Language Switcher' block to make their choice, and the language can be specified in URL's.

Configuration

  1. Install the localisation files if not already installed (currently https://download.civicrm.org/civicrm-5.11.0-l10n.tar.gz). See the Installation section in the...
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08 March, 2019
By Nicol

Late last year CiviCRM won some seed funding from Mozilla’s MOSS fund to support the core team, and also research our community priorities. We're focussing on two questions connected to CiviCRM’s future growth and sustainability:

  • how do non-profits chose their CRM? what would make them consider and chose CiviCRM or not?
  • how well do users of CiviCRM in languages other than English interact with CiviCRM and what should we focus on improving?

There’s a lot of possible answers to the first questions, which spans from marketing to visibility, features to usability, costs to risk. Almost everyone in the community has a viewpoint on it; and that’s what’s driving this research inquiry - we want to identify general trends, while tapping into the huge breadth of knowledge between us. We’ve created separate surveys for CRM end-users themselves (who may not be CiviCRM users) and CiviCRM...

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03 January, 2019
By BjoernE
Happy New Year, CiviCRM community! I bring exciting news to all of those,  who have to deal with localisation (l10n) and internationalisation (i18n) - in short:  everyone who is occasionally unhappy with the texts in the user interface or public forms. And yes, that might include English forms as well.
 
The origin of this post goes back to some inspiring discussions I had with Tim Otten and Aidan Saunders at the Bamford sprint in autumn 2018. We were aiming for nothing short of the revolution of CiviCRM's translation system. Soon you will be able to adjust the translations on-the-fly, or inject a whole cascade of custom translation (.mo) files into the system to make the UI say exactly what you want it to say.
 
Over the holidays, I finally had some time to follow up on those ideas, and implemented a working prototype of stage one of this revolution. In short, I created an extension (...
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24 October, 2017
By marko

With the funding environment for nonprofits in Serbia becoming increasingly more fragmented and the choice of technology tools to aid fundraising and advocacy becoming more diverse, Catalyst Balkans saw an opportunity to fill an open niche for a localized CRM targeted to the nonprofit sector in the Western Balkans. With Catalyst Balkans already having used CiviCRM for several years for its own communication and contact management needs, the localization of CiviCRM was a natural choice.

With virtually zero strings translated into Serbian on Transifex and a very limited budget, Catalyst used a combination of existing staff resources and volunteers to plug away at the translation effort over a period of months. The final 1500 strings were done with the help of a translation professional who also went through and polished the entire translation file.

Many coffees were spent...

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06 October, 2017
By Parvez

Our new extension aims to enable charities/organisations to manage their supporters in a GDPR compliant manner. GDPR in itself does not introduce many new directives however it does make organisation appointed officials directly responsible for any breach in directive and therefore has a degree of responsibility which had been missing from previous iterations.

It’s important to understand that simply implementing an opt in process and assuming all contacts are opted out overnight is probably not what is best for your organisation, there are many factors to consider before determining that a formal opt in is required. For example a membership organisation is well within its rights to assume that member communications are assumed opt in unless the member explicitly opts out. Its also a fair assumption where contacts have been imported from third party fundraising systems, where they can represent your charity and they have stated they are happy to be...

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13 September, 2017

One confident step and the road to the larger target audience as well as global markets got shorter.  With a thorough preparation and the right team, Agiliway has filled in another gap in CiviCRM localization.

While working on CiviCRM customization for one of the Ukrainian political organizations, we checked the progress of the Ukrainian localization only to discover a few thousand strings still waiting for translation. To make matters worse, the bulk of localized strings did not correspond semantically with the source language text.

Definitely not something that would drive Agiliway team to a halt. We decided to take the matter into our own hands and get CiviCRM fully localized into the Ukrainian language. A team of professional linguists has been put together to translate the missing bits, verify and...

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09 January, 2017

JMA Consulting is pleased to welcome Jon Goldberg as our new Director of Operations effective today.

After a brief stint as a political organizer, Jon spent 13 years working in various capacities at a non-profit legal organization, primarily in IT.  In 2010 he co-founded Palante Technology Cooperative and started their CiviCRM department, where he worked for 7 years.  Outside of work, Jon can be found engaging in queer community organizing, (dis-)assembling electronics, and training parrots.

"I'm really excited to have Jon join us given his keen appreciation of how to help progressive organizations achieve their missions using CiviCRM. He's got a deep and wide knowledge of CiviCRM. I appreciate how he gives back to the community like through StackExchange, where he is the top ranked CiviCRM contributor," said Joe Murray, President of JMA Consulting and co-author of...

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18 November, 2016

CiviCRM support for multiple languages and locales has been present for many years already. Features like multilingual donation forms, for instance, are now both common and easy to use. Some usages, however, have remained a source of minor headaches. With the release of CiviCRM 4.7.13, a small step has been made in order to fix a major annoyance that affected multilingual emails.

(billet disponible en français)

The annoyance

Until now, there was no effective way for CiviCRM to determine the target language of mail merge tokens when mass emailing. Consequently, many emails would end up with :

  • badly translated tokens (ex: prefixes such as « Mrs » appeared in English instead of being translated to « Mme » when sending out content written in French)
  • links that didn't point to content in the right language (ex: ubsubscribe...
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18 August, 2016

Ever wanted to know Hebrew birthdays, yahrzeit dates, and other Hebrew dates for your contacts?  Now you can track all these dates, search on them, prepare lists,  and send reminders at the right time, and more.   Since this is a native CiviCRM extension, it will work under Drupal, WordPress or Joomla.

Get the extension at: https://civicrm.org/extensions/hebrew-calendar

Full documentation at: https://github.com/sgladstone/com.fountaintribe.hebrewcalendarhelper/wiki

Related extensions and recipes: https://wiki.civicrm.org/confluence/display/CRMDOC/CiviShul+Cookbook

Some examples:

...

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30 September, 2015
By BjoernE

If you (and your colleagues/users) are an English native speaker, DON'T READ THIS. You don't have to bother. Lucky you.

The CiviCRM localisation has come a long way, and by now it's pretty comprehensive and surprisingly versatile. Sometimes the quality of the translated strings is a little questionable, ranging from "strange" to "funny", and sometimes far into the absurd. But that's mostly due to inexperienced translators, and nothing that a little bit of quality control by the Transifex coordinators can't fix.

There is, however, one problem that's been particularly elusive. What to do if the same English word has two or more different translations in your language, depending on the context? I'll give you an example in my native language, German:

  1. "Write an email to Mark" would translate as "Schreibe eine E-Mail an Mark".
  2. "CodeSprint will be from the 10th to the 16th" would translate as "...
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