26 September, 2012
By micah
Filed under CiviContribute, Sprints

Greetings from Apeldoorn at the Netherlands CiviCRM Code Sprint. I've spent the last several months meticulously working with the fundraising team at the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) to build donate pages that look and act beautifully, remove friction from the donation process, and leverage premiums to get bigger donations.

At the England and Netherlands code sprints after CiviCon London I spent most of my time building a lot of the functionality that I've made for EFF into CiviCRM Core and updating the default contribution page templates. These new contribution pages will be part of the 4.3 release.

Before

I'll start with screenshots from a contribution page in 4.2. Here is the header and some price sets, where you get to choose your amount, choose if you want to make a one-time contribution or a recurring one, and enter your email address:

...

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24 September, 2012
Filed under Sprints

Today was the first day of the Apeldoorn part of the post-CiviCon sprints. A bit of a chaotic day with people coming in, shopping and lots of logistics. A nice cold too on top of that, although a real community one! Alice and Xavier are suffering from the same cold.....Xavier at home in bed, and Alice and I shared a sniffing office today :-) I did get a first draft on my requirements for CiviMobile Activities and Cases, blog post to follow. I am planning to discuss that with Kurund and later Peter McAndrew tomorrow. And I hope to get a wiki page on how the latest API should behave done with Eileen (the Queen of API) on Wednesday. More to follow!

24 September, 2012
Filed under Sprints

We're just wrapping up the first of two post-CiviCon code sprints, where 24 people came together at Butcombe Farms near Bristol. People worked on an amazing variety of things to make 4.2 more stable, and to contribute some awesome features to 4.3. Some of the things we did were:

  • Leez, Coleman and Simon all worked on the cool new notification system.
  • Eileen and Yashodha contributed a fix for contribution api & import in 4.2 and added a new API for price sets and line-items.
  • Micah has gotten jQuery validate up and running on 4.3 and integrated it with our notifications. He also worked on ui enhancements to contribution pages and other public forms.
  • Rajesh contributed the much-requested Wordpress permissioning system, and made some...
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23 September, 2012

As part of the Bristol Civi Sprint a proposed new layout has been suggested for the existing Find and Merge Duplicates page. The page is used to add / edit Duplicate Matching Rules for the individual, organisation and household contact types. This wouldn't involve changes to the way the Merge Rules work but the changes will make the page easier to use and understand.

 

This would include changing the use of the confusing terms 'Strict' and 'Fuzzy' to 'Front End' and 'Back End' respectively.  On-screen help text will explain what the terms mean and how to use the page features. The names of the Rules would also be altered so they reflect the fields used to identify a matching contact.

 

A mockup of the proposed changes can be found here;
http://wiki.civicrm.org/confluence/display/CRM/Find+Merge+UI+Changes

14 June, 2012
By brylie

Michael McAndrew

[F]orget not that the earth delights to feel your bare feet and the winds long to play with your hair. --Kahlil Gibran

 

Yuba Confluence

[T]hat which is boundless in you abides in the mansion of the sky... --Kahlil Gibran

 

    [T]here are those who give and know not pain in giving, nor do they seek joy,...

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19 April, 2012
By JonGold
Filed under Sprints
For years, I've wanted to give back to the open source communities I'm a part of.  Often I'm told, "Write code."  More than any other project I've seen, CiviCRM has created alternative ways of contributing back.  At the code sprint, I met people brand new to CiviCRM contribute meaningfully by proposing (and critiquing) workflows for new features, create how-to screencasts, and more.

But I'm a techie, not a non-profit employee.  I want to make a technical contribution.  I know the fundamentals of programming, but have little experience. When Lobo sent me a personal e-mail inviting me to the code sprint, I told him I didn't think I'd be useful.  Lobo's response was, "Come anyway."

So I went to the idyllic Woolman School, and for six days, I was surrounded by many of the world's CiviCRM programming experts.  Everyone else knew CiviCRM's code, I didn't.  Everyone else had features to add, or projects to hack on - I had a general desire to "help out" while learning the code...
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05 April, 2012
By lobo
Filed under CiviCon, CiviCRM, Drupal, Joomla, Sprints

 

We had our 4th CiviCon in San Francisco a few days back. It was a very well attended event with very high quality sessions. We hope to have most of the videos online in the next few weeks. I'm quite keen on watching all the sessions that I had to miss. There were lots of highlights for me personally during this event, i'll make an attempt to recreate some of them here:

  • The quality of the talks I attended were very high. Most groups are using CiviCRM very creatively and pushing the limits in multiple ways. We need to continue on increasing the extensibility thus giving developers / integrators more choice.
  • The quality of the Birds of a Feather session was very high. Unfortunately these were not recorded. Jim's talk on how they use ...
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26 March, 2012
By Eileen
Filed under Architecture, Sprints

Last week I wrote a blog about technical debt (comparing it to keeping a kitchen in order). I got a lot of feedback - most of it constructive. I'm going to resist belabouring the whole metaphor & limit this blog to a quick summary of some of the discussion that came out of it.

 

It's about making it better

There is such a thing as code without technical debt. It is found in textbooks & outputs the words 'hello world'. Code that is actually used has technical debt. Technical debt is a natural by-product of writing code without unlimited resources & time. So, while addressing technical debt is a good thing - saying that CiviCRM has technical debt is like saying CiviCRM is software.

 

On the flipside, it's important to note that CiviCRM is a remarkable piece of software & it represents a remarkable commitment by...

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03 March, 2012
By rajesh
Filed under Sprints

It has been an amazing Code Sprint in London this week. Lots done in the week, including GiftAid module fixes to work with Drupal 7/CiviCRM 4.x branch. CiviMobile, CiviCRM testing, Documentation.

 

Thanks for Katy for arranging the work space in CAN Mezzanine. Thanks to the members of the community who participated in the event and a big thanks to Lobo and Kurund from the core team for making the sprint a success.

 

Highlights of the past 5 days

  • Erawat and myself did the fixes for CiviCRM GiftAid module to work with Drupal 7/CiviCRM 4.x branch and updated the wiki page.
  • Peter McAndrew working on profiles for CiviMobile. Erawat doing the cool location search feature for CiviMobile (including the 'Use Current Location' feature). Myself doing...
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03 March, 2012
By xavier

Hi,

The code sprint in London has finished yesterday. It's always a pleasure to see old civi friends and meet new ones. Thanks to Michael and Katy to have organized it. Time for a quick update of what I've been working on with the most obscure title I could find. My focus has been on usuability to make civicrm easier and faster to use.

 

To make our crm more user friendly, we need to make the pages more "application like", where you can add, edit remove and reorder from the same page without having to switch and go to more pages with forms to fill and save. And load. And wait. And save, and load and wait more...

 

For instance  -and that will be a make it happen that we launch next week to improve- creating a survey today means you have to go to visit a different page to create the survey, the profile, for each field you add in the profile, for each custom field you need to...

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